Watch News High School Sport Today - HIGHSCORE


HIGHSCORE/WBCA Players of the Week: January 25-31 - HIGHSCORE
MaxPreps/WBCA Players of the Week: January 25-31
The Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) has announced its High School Players of the Week presented by MaxPreps and Wilson Sporting Goods.

Player of the Week honors are awarded to a deserving student-athlete who demonstrated outstanding play in her respective region of the country. Head coaches submit nominations each week and the WBCA selects the individual based on stats that were submitted.

Here are this week's honorees:

Region 1:
3 Games Played
Points (per game): 15.0 Rebounds: 3.3 Steals: 7.0

Region 2:
3 Games Played
Points: 29.7 Rebounds: 18.3 Steals: 3.3

Region 3: 
2 Games Played
Points: 38.0 Rebounds: 16.5 Steals: 6.5

Region 4: 
3 Games Played:
Points: 33.0 Rebounds: 8.0 Steals: 8.6

Region 5: 
2 Games Played
Points: 32.0 Rebounds: 9.0 Steals: 2.5

Region 6: 
4 Games Played
Points: 25.8 Rebounds: 8.0 Steals: 2.5

Region 7: 
2 Games Played
Points: 27.0 Rebounds: 12.0 Steals: 2.5

Region 8:
1 Game Played
Points: 19.0 Rebounds: 5.0 Steals: 4.0

Region 9:
4 Games Played
Points: 34.8 Rebounds: 19.2 Steals: 3.0

To obtain a coach's login or for questions about our player of the week programs, please contact Aaron Hendricks (E-Mail: [email protected] Phone: (530)313-5158.
Where every 2021 MLB Opening Day starting pitcher went to high school - HIGHSCORE
Where every 2021 MLB Opening Day starting pitcher went to high school
With Opening Day of the 2021 MLB season set for Thursday, it's always fun to look back at where all of the starting pitchers went to high school. California has bragging rights this season as seven of the 30 projected starters finished their high school career playing in the Golden State.

In fact, three came from the same school, which is more than any state outside of California.

Jack Flaherty, Lucas Giolito and Max Fried all graduated from Harvard-Westlake. Giolito and Fried were both first-round selections in the 2012 MLB Draft while Flaherty was selected in the first round two years later.

Gerrit Cole, Kyle Hendricks, Shane Bieber and Tyler Glasnow are the other four Opening Day starters from California.

Colorado, Florida and Texas were the only other states with at least two pitchers featured.

In total, 15 states are represented along with the Dominican Republic, Japan, South Korea and Venezuela.
Graphic by Ryan Escobar
American League East

Baltimore Orioles — John Means, Gardner-Edgerton (Gardner, Kan.) | Class of 2011
Didn't have any Division 1 offers coming out of high school but was selected in the 46th round of the 2011 MLB draft. Means elected to go to Fort Scott Community College before transferring to West Virginia a year later. He played his junior and senior year of high school with the Kansas City Royals' Bubba Starling, who was selected fifth overall in the 2011 MLB Draft.

Boston Red Sox — Nathan Eovaldi, Alvin (Texas) | Class of 2008
After missing his junior season because of Tommy John surgery, he came back his senior year and went 12-1 with a 1.66 ERA. He added three saves and posted 72 strikeouts in 70.2 innings. Eovaldi was selected in the 11th round of the 2008 MLB Draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers and helped the Red Sox to a World Series championship in 2018.

New York Yankees — Gerrit Cole, Orange Lutheran (Orange, Calif.) | Class of 2008
Went 8-2 during his senior year posting a 0.47 ERA to go with 121 strikeouts in 75 innings. The Yankees selected Cole with the 28th overall pick in 2008 but he elected to go to UCLA and after a three-year career with the Bruins he was taken first overall in the 2011 MLB Draft by the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Tampa Bay Rays — Tyler Glasnow, Hart (Newhall, Calif.) | Class of 2011
He became the seventh player to graduate from Hart that has played in the World Series joining Bob Walk, Kevin Millar, James Shields, Mike Montgomery, Todd Zeile and Trevor Bauer. He only had one offer coming out of high school and was selected in the fifth round of the 2011 MLB Draft by the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Toronto Blue Jays — Hyun-jin Ryu, South Korea
A year before signing with the Hanwha Eagles of the Korean Baseball Organization in 2006 he played for his high school team in the Blue Dragon Open National Championship and did not allow a run throwing 22 consecutive scoreless innings and batted .389. After a seven-year career in the KBO, he has posted a 2.95 ERA in the Majors during his first eight seasons.

American League Central

Chicago White Sox — Lucas Giolito, Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, Calif.) | Class of 2012
The first of three Harvard-Westlake graduates featured who will be starting on Opening Day. He finished his high school career with a 12-2 record and 1.51 ERA and suffered an elbow injury during his senior year that resulted in Tommy John surgery. He struck out 106 batters in 97.2 innings. Giolito was selected 16th overall by the Washington Nationals in the 2012 MLB Draft.

Cleveland Indians — Shane Bieber, Laguna Hills (Calif.) | Class of 2013
The reigning American League Cy Young award winner went 8-4 during his senior year posting a 1.40 ERA. After a three-year career at UC Santa Barbara, he was selected in the fourth round of the 2016 draft by Cleveland.

Detroit Tigers — Matthew Boyd, Eastside Catholic (Sammamish, Wash.) | Class of 2009
Went 7-2 during his senior year striking out 91 batters in 58 innings while posting a 0.84 ERA. The season before he was 7-0 with a 0.71 ERA to go with 58 strikeouts in 39.2 innings.

Kansas City Royals — Brad Keller, Flowery Branch (Ga.) | Class of 2013
Entered his senior year of high school with no offers or any interest from the Majors but in a regular season matchup against Clint Frazier and Loganville (Ga.) everything changed. He struck out Frazier during his first two at-bats and the interest picked up after that game from MLB scouts. Keller was selected in the eighth round of the 2013 draft by the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Minnesota Twins — Kenta Maeda, Japan
Maeda was selected by the Hiroshima Toyo Carp's in the 2006 Nippon Professional Baseball league draft out of PL Gakuen Senior High School. He pitched in the NPB from 2008 until 2015 before signing with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He has gone 53-36 with a 3.75 ERA during his first five years in the Majors.

American League West

Houston Astros Zack Greinke, Apopka (Fla.) | Class of 2002
Named the 2002 Gatorade Player of the Year after going 9-2 during his senior year, posting a 0.55 earned run average to go with 118 strikeouts in 63 innings. The 2009 American League Cy Young winner finished his high school career with 31 home runs.

Los Angeles Angels Dylan Bundy, Owasso (Okla.) | Class of 2011
The only Opening Day starter to be named the Gatorade Athlete of the Year. He took home the award in 2011 and the only other two baseball players to claim this honor since 2003 are MacKenzie Gore (2017) and Bobby Witt Jr. (2019). During his senior year, he went 11-0 and had a 0.25 ERA to go with 158 strikeouts in 71 innings. Bundy was named the Oklahoma Gatorade Player of the Year in each of his final three years of high school and was selected fourth overall in the 2011 MLB Draft by the Baltimore Orioles.

Oakland Athletics Chris Bassitt, Genoa Area (Genoa, Ohio) | Class of 2007
Bassitt posted a 1.56 ERA during his senior year and struck out 65 batters in 56 innings. He was also a standout basketball player and was named to the all-league team in both sports.

Seattle Mariners Marco Gonzales, Rocky Mountain (Fort Collins, Colo.) | Class of 2010
Gonzales won a state title every year during his high school career. He went 11-0 during his senior season and posted a 2.20 ERA to go with 87 strikeouts in 54 innings. Named the Colorado Gatorade Player of the Year that season and also batted .486 to go with seven home runs and 36 RBI. 

Texas Rangers Kyle Gibson, Greenfield-Central (Greenfield, Ind.) | Class of 2006
Went 15-8 during his two years pitching for the Cougars while posting a 1.19 ERA to go with 251 strikeouts. He was selected in the 36th round of the 2006 draft by the Philadelphia Phillies but elected to go to the University of Missouri instead.

National League East

Atlanta Braves Max Fried, Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, Calif.) | Class of 2012
Only played his senior year at Harvard-Westlake after transferring from Montclair Prep (Van Nuys) after it shut down the baseball program. Fried went 8-2 with a 2.02 ERA to go with 105 strikeouts in 66 innings during his senior season and was selected seventh overall by the San Diego Padres in the 2012 MLB Draft.

Miami Marlins Sandy Alcantara, Dominican Republic
Pitched professionally in the Dominican Republic and was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 2013 as an international free agent.

In high school, one of the best pitchers currently in baseball was barely noticed. He attended a school that had roughly 400 students from kindergarten to 12th grade and went undrafted during the 2007 draft. Shortstop was his primary position and he might of been an even better basketball player in high school. Played third base and shortstop during his first two years of college at Stetson University before pitching in 17 games during his junior season. The Mets selected deGrom in the ninth round of the 2010 MLB Draft.

Philadelphia Phillies Aaron Nola, Catholic (Baton Rouge, La.) | Class of 2011
Finished his high school career 21-2 and had 214 strikeouts in 152 innings. Nola posted a sub-1.85 ERA in each of his final three years and was named the Class 5A State Player of the Year by the Louisiana Sportswriters Association in 2011. He helped lead the Bears to a 5A state title during his junior season.

Washington Nationals Max Scherzer, Parkway Central (Chesterfield, Mo.) | Class of 2003
The three-time Cy Young award winner played baseball and basketball all four years of high school and started at quarterback as a freshman for the football team. During his final game as a high school pitcher he threw a five-inning no-hitter while striking out 13 batters. Scherzer was selected in the 43rd round of the 2003 draft by the St. Louis Cardinals but elected to go to the University of Missouri. After a three-year career with the Tigers, he was selected 11th overall in the 2006 MLB Draft by the Arizona Diamondbacks.

National League Central

Went 8-2 during his senior year and posted a 0.93 ERA while striking out 65 batters in 75 innings. The Angels selected Hendricks in the 39th round in 2008 but he elected to go Dartmouth and was taken by the Texas Rangers in the eighth round three years later.

Cincinnati Reds — Luis Castillo, Dominican Republic
Pitched professionally in the Dominican Republic and was signed by the San Francisco Giants in 2011 as an international free agent.

Milwaukee Brewers — Brandon Woodruff, Wheeler (Miss.) | Class of 2011
Led the Eagles with a .618 average and three home runs during his senior season and posted a 1.62 ERA en route to being an all-state selection. As a junior, he went 5-3 with a 2.98 ERA while striking out 100 batters in 49.1 innings to go with a .534 average and five home runs. As a sophomore, he had 46 strikeouts in 18 innings and posted a 1.20 ERA to go with a .565 batting average, nine home runs and 31 RBI.

Pittsburgh Pirates — Chad Kuhl, Middletown (Del.) | Class of 2010
He comes from the same high school as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Chris Godwin and was named the state's Player of the Year in 2010 by the Delaware Baseball Coaches Association after going 9-2 while posting a 1.47 ERA. He was also an all-state selection as a first baseman after batting .433 with eight home runs.

St. Louis Cardinals — Jack Flaherty, Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, Calif.) | Class of 2014
The year after Giolito and Fried graduated, Flaherty, then a junior, led the Wolverines to a CIF Southern Section Division 1 title. He pitched a complete-game shutout and drove in the lone run in a 1-0 win against Marina (Huntington Beach) at Dodger Stadium. Flaherty went 23-0 during his final two years of high school and posted a 0.63 ERA to go with 237 strikeouts in 167 innings. He was named the California Gatorade Player of the Year in 2014.

National League West

Arizona Diamondbacks — Madison Bumgarner, South Caldwell (Hudson, N.C.) | Class of 2007
The 2014 World Series MVP went 11-2 during his senior year and had a 1.05 ERA to go with 143 strikeouts in 86 innings. He hit .424 with 11 home runs and 38 RBI while leading the Spartans to a 4A state championship. Bumgarner was named the North Carolina Gatorade Player of the Year and was selected 10th overall in 2007 by the San Francisco Giants.

Colorado Rockies — German Marquez, Venezuela
Pitched professionally in Venezuela before signing an international deal with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2011. 

Los Angeles Dodgers — Clayton Kershaw, Highland Park (Dallas) | Class of 2006
The three-time National League Cy Young award winner went 13-0 and posted a 0.77 ERA during his senior season. He added 139 strikeouts in 64 innings and was selected seventh overall in the 2006 MLB Draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Kershaw was named the Gatorade National Player of the Year in 2006.

San Diego Padres — Yu Darvish, Japan
Darvish was 7-3 in his final year for Tohoku High School and despite being heavily scouted, chose to play professionally in Japan for the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters. After a seven-year career in Japan, he signed with the Texas Rangers in 2012 and has a career 3.47 ERA in nine seasons.

San Francisco Giants — Kevin Gausman, Grandview (Aurora, Colo.) | Class of 2010
Went 5-3 with a 4.41 ERA and had 76 strikeouts in 52.1 innings and batted .371 during his senior season to go with three home runs and 27 RBI. The Los Angeles Dodgers selected him in the sixth round of the 2010 MLB Draft but elected to go to LSU and was taken fourth overall two years later by the Baltimore Orioles after going 12-2 with a 2.77 ERA during his sophomore season for the Tigers.
High school baseball: Greatest coach from every state - HIGHSCORE
High school baseball: Greatest coach from every state
Some have been fixtures in the third base coaches box for more than 50 years. Many of them have won more than 1,000 games in their career. All of them are among the nation's greatest high school baseball coaches of all-time.

MaxPreps is identifying the Greatest Baseball Coach of All-Time in Each State and the list is an impressive one. John Stevenson of El Segundo, who coached MLB great George Brett; Mike Cameron of Archbishop Moeller, who mentored Hall of Famer Ken Griffey Jr.; and Rodger Fairless of Green Valley, who coached Hall of Fame pitcher Greg Maddux, are just some of the names found among the 50 Greats from 50 States.
Mike Woods, Hamilton baseball coach
File photo by Mark Jones
Mike Woods, Hamilton baseball coach
Greatest high school baseball coach from every state

Alabama
William Booth, Hartselle

He became the winningest coach in the state in 2006 when he won his 648th game, topping previous state record holder Sammy Dunn of Vestavia Hills. That was 15 years ago and Booth is still going strong. He's upped that win total to 1,095 (including the 2021 season) with 488 losses. He's won eight state championships at Hartselle.

Alaska
Ed Conway, Sitka

Conway led Sitka, a small school with an enrollment of under 400, to multiple large school championships, winning three in a row between 2005-07. After 20 years at Sitka, Conway won his final game, capturing the state championship with an 11-10 win over two-time defending state champion South (Anchorage).

Arizona
Mike Woods, Hamilton (Chandler)

The most successful coach in Arizona over the past quarter century, Woods is the only baseball coach the Huskies have ever had. He had a record of 504-197 entering the 2021 season and his teams have won seven state championships. Hamilton was also ranked No. 1 in the nation by MaxPreps when COVID ended the 2020 season. Hamilton is ranked No. 10 in the MaxPreps Top 25.

Arkansas
Billy Bock, Pine Bluff

He reportedly never had a losing season at the four schools where he coached. He sprinkled nine state championships between St. Anne's Academy, Sylvan Hills, Arkansas High and Pine Bluff. He set a state record with four straight state championships at the latter school (1983-86) coupled with the one at Arkansas (1982) to give him five in a row. He finished his career 641-121.

California
John Stevenson, El Segundo

No California coach has more wins than Stevenson, who coached El Segundo for 50 years and went 1,059-419. He won 30 league championships and seven Southern Section crowns. Among his top players were Hall of Fame third baseman George Brett, his brother Ken Brett and pitcher Scott McGregor.

Colorado
Jim Danley, Eaton

He oversaw one of the top small school teams in the nation, posting a record of 807-162-2 in 45 years as head coach. He led the Fightin' Reds to 29 Final Four appearances, 23 straight regional titles, 11 state championships and 36 league championships.

Connecticut
John Fontana, Southington

Fontana coached 41 years for the Blue Knights and produced a program that went 669-157 during his tenure for an .810 winning percentage. His teams won 24 conference championships and a pair of state titles. His 1999 team finished the season ranked No. 44 in the nation by Baseball America.

Delaware
Matt Smith, St. Mark's (Wilmington)

Although he's coached 22 seasons, Smith is closing in quickly on the all-time wins record in Delaware. He has 383 wins while the all-time record for the state is 496. Smith has also led St. Mark's to 10 of their 14 baseball state championships.

District of Columbia
Eddie Saah, Wilson

He established a District of Columbia dynasty at Wilson, winning 27 straight DCIAA championships. Saah coached 16 years, won 16 DCIAA championships and had a league record of 210-1.

Florida
Rich Hoffman, Westminster Christian (Miami), Westminster Academy (Fort Lauderdale)

Coaching at two different schools during the late 1990s, Hoffman led Westminster Christian to three straight state championships and a national title by Baseball America. He took the job at Westminster Academy and won two more state championships, for five in a row. The high school coach of Alex Rodriguez, Hoffman won 1,020 games in his career to go with 10 state titles. Two of his teams (1992 and 1996 Westminster Christian) have been named national champions.

Georgia
Bobby Howard, Columbus

The state's all-time winningest coach with 1,008 wins (heading into the 2021 season), Howard spent 31 seasons at Columbus, where he led the Blue Devils to 12 state championships.

Hawaii
Erik Kadooka, Punahou (Honolulu)

Punahou dominated under the leadership of Kadooka in the early 2000s. He led the Buff ‘n Blue to seven straight state championships between 2004 to 2010.

Idaho
Dwight Church, Lewiston

Coached the high school and American Legion teams from 1954 to the 1970s. He led the high school team to seven state championships and had a career record of 673-231. As an American Legion coach, he won 23 state championships, including 12 in a row. His high school and legion record combined was 2,427-889.

Illinois
Percy Moore, Lane Tech (Chicago)

At the height of Lane Tech's dominance in the 1920s and 30s, Moore had as many as 733 players try out for the team. Moore coached 29 years at Lane Tech, winning 13 City League championships and losing only two section championships. His team also played in the New York-Chicago Inter-City championship four times between 1920 and 1926, winning twice.

Indiana
Dave Pishkur, Andrean (Merrillville)

The 2019 season was a big one for Pishkur as he won a state championship, won 35 straight games, went over 1,000 career wins and became the all-time winningest coach in state history. He began the 2021 season with a record of 1,014-284 in 40 years with seven state championships.

Iowa
Gene Schulz, Kee (Lansing)

Schulz is the all-time national leader in spring/summer baseball wins with 1,578 victories. He has 1,754 wins in summer and fall seasons combined with a winning percentage of .815 (1,754-398). He also won a total of 11 state championships, nine of them in the spring/summer, with his 1973 squad going 48-0.

Kansas
Mike Watt, St. Mary's-Colgan (Pittsburg)

The American Baseball Coaches Association national coach of the year in 2016 after winning his 16th state championship, Watt is also a member of the Kansas Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame. His team won seven straight state championships in the 2000s and added four straight between 2013-16. He has won over 600 career games.

Kentucky
Bill Miller, Pleasure Ridge Park (Louisville)

Guided his team to 1,144 career wins with 305 losses, giving him the most wins in state history when he passed away in the middle of the 2018 season. He won six state championships in Kentucky's one-division playoff system, including three in a row from 1994 to 1996. His 2008 team finished No. 7 in the final national rankings by Baseball America.

Louisiana
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe (Lake Charles)

Ranked as the top team in the state of Louisiana with a 35-2 record, Cecchini is closing in on 1,000 career wins. He has 971 as of last week's sweep of Alexandria in the state playoffs. Cecchini was the National Coach of the Year in 2020 and his team has won four state championships with a No. 1 national ranking in 2014.
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe baseball coach
File photo by Roddy Johnson
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe baseball coach
Maine
Bob Kelley, Bangor

No school has won more state baseball championships than Bangor, and Kelley is the main reason. He coached at the school for 32 seasons, winning 15 East championships and eight state championships.

Maryland
Bernie Walter, Arundel (Gambrills)

Walter won state championships in four different decades as he led the Wildcats to a state record 10 titles in his 37-year career. He ended his career with a record of 609-185.

Massachusetts
Emile Johnson Jr, Leominster

Led 42 of his 43 teams to the state tournament and never had a losing season for the Blue Devils. He set the state record for career wins with 725 and he won three state championships.

Michigan
Larry Tuttle, Blissfield

Earlier this month, Tuttle went over 1,300 career wins. He's closing in on the state's all-time leader, Pat O'Keefe, for the state record. Tuttle has a career mark of 1,312-426-5, as of Wednesday. According to the Daily Telegram, Tuttle has won 39 conference titles, 32 district championships, 23 regional crowns and seven state titles.

Minnesota
Bob Karn, St. Cloud Cathedral (St. Cloud)

He's coached for 50 years and late last month went over 800 career wins. He's already the winningest coach in state history. His teams have won nine state championships, including back-to-back titles in 2014-15. Cathedral had a 58-game win streak during that span and he was the National Coach of the Year by the American Baseball Coaches Association.

Mississippi
Jerry Boatner, West Lauderdale (Collinsville)

Boatner coached baseball for 50 years in Mississippi, 45 of those years at West Lauderdale. He won 14 state championships and he had a record of 1,202-359, the most wins of any coach in the state.

Missouri
Tony Perkins, Howell (St. Charles)

In 22 seasons at Howell, Perkins has reached the state championship game seven times with titles in 2003, 2011, 2013 and 2016. He is 501-225 with 14 conference championships and 10 sectional crowns.

Nebraska
Bill Olson, Omaha Northwest (Omaha)

Northwest dominated Nebraska baseball in the 1980s, winning six state championships, including four in a row from 1982-85. His 1983 team was ranked No. 1 in the nation by Baseball America. He won over 1,500 games between high school and American Legion.

Nevada
Rodger Fairless, Green Valley (Henderson)

In 19 seasons at Green Valley and El Dorado, Fairless produced 12 state championship teams, including six in a row at Green Valley. He also developed future Hall of Fame pitcher Greg Maddux. He had a record of 493-80 at the two schools.

New Hampshire
Tom Underwood, Plymouth

Guided Plymouth for 43 seasons, retiring after the 2015 season. He led Plymouth to six state championships, including three in a row from 1980-82. He retired as the all-time winningest coach in the state with 518 wins.

New Jersey
Ken Frank, Toms River South (Toms River)

The all-time winningest coach in New Jersey, Frank is closing in on 900 wins and reportedly needs four more to hit the milestone. He's won five group championships, 10 sectional titles and 22 division crowns.

New Mexico
Jim Johns, Eldorado (Albuquerque)

Racked up 552 wins and 201 losses to finish third among the state's all-time wins leaders. He also won seven state championships including three straight from 1999 to 2001.

New York
Mike Turo, Monroe Campus (Bronx)

Prior to the 2021 season, Turo had won 35 borough championships in his 42 seasons at Monroe. He also has won six city championships and is 1,369-227.

North Carolina
Henry Jones, Cherryville

Jones's teams made the playoffs in 24 of his 28 seasons, winning six state championships all totaled. He set a Gaston County record with a career total of 542 career wins.

North Dakota
Pete Dobitz, Dickinson

Dobitz has coached at Dickinson since 2000 and led the Midgets to more state titles than any other school in the state, capturing five championships.

Ohio
Mike Cameron, Archbishop Moeller (Cincinnati)

Cameron coached a number of great players, including Hall of Fame players Ken Griffey Jr. and Barry Larkin, during his 39 years at Moeller. He finished his career with a record of 767-303 with four state championships.

Oklahoma
Murl Bowen, Asher

Bowen finished his career as the winningest coach in all of high school baseball when fall and spring seasons are complied. He had a record of 2,115-349 for an .858 winning percentage. He also went 1,063-216 in the spring with 22 state championships. He added 20 state titles in the fall for a total of 43.

Oregon
Dave Gasser, Lakeridge (Lake Oswego), Astoria

Gasser coached at four different schools and won one state title at Madison, two at Lakeridge and two at Astoria. His career record of 750-235 ranks No. 1 in wins in state history.

Pennsylvania
Bob Thomas, Chambersburg

Thomas retired as the state's all-time wins leader with 833 wins in 1,112 games over a 51-year career. He won 22 league championships and three state titles.

Rhode Island
Ed Holloway, Bishop Hendricken (Warwick)

In close to 25 years of coaching the Hawks, Holloway's teams have dominated Rhode Island baseball, winning 16 state championships including five in a row from 2012-2016.

South Carolina
David Horton, Bamberg-Ehrhardt (Bamberg)

The all-time winningest coach in state history, Horton's teams went 889-261 (.773) in his 44 seasons at the helm. Bamberg-Ehrhardt won 14 state championships under Horton, including eight in a row from 1974-1981, tying a national mark for consecutive state championships.

Tennessee
Buster Kelso, Christian Brothers (Memphis)

The state's winningest coach, Kelso has spent 36 seasons at Christian Brothers and led them to nine state championships, including back-to-back titles in 2015-16 and 2000-01. He went over 1,100 wins this year and has 1,107 with 347 losses.

Texas
Steve Chapman, Calallen (Corpus Christi)

Chapman has won nearly 82 percent of his games in 45 seasons at the helm of Calallen. His 1,080 career wins rank second in state history, but is 35 wins behind all-time leader Bobby Moegle (1,115). Chapman has won three state titles and reached the state finals eight times. He also has won 28 district championships and gone to the playoffs 30 straight seasons.

Utah
Bailey Santiseven, Bingham (South Jordan)

Santiseven was a high school coaching pioneer in Utah, getting his start in 1930 and coaching at Bingham for 26 seasons before passing away in 1954. He led Bingham to a state record 12 baseball championships and also won four state titles in football.

Vermont
Orrie Jay, Burlington

The "Orrie Jay" trophy is awarded to the top team in the Metro League each year, in honor of the Burlington coach who led his team to eight state championships, seven runner-up finishes and 16 Northern League crowns in his 30 years of coaching at the school.

Virginia
Mack Shupe, JJ Kelly, now Central (Norton)

Shupe retired in 2009 after 40 years of coaching with a 631-173 record, the second highest total in Virginia history. No coach in the state has won more titles than Shupe, however, as he earned eight championships. He won all of his titles at J.J. Kelly, where he spent 33 of his 40 seasons.

Washington
Kim Cox, DeSales (Walla Walla)

Cox coached for 34 years at De Sales, racking up a record of 670-134 for an .833 winning percentage. He won a state record 19 state championships at the school and made the playoffs 30 years in a row.

West Virginia
John Lowery, Jefferson (Shenandoah Junction)

The only coach Jefferson has ever had, Lowery is in his 50th year at the school (not counting last year's COVID season) and has won 12 state championships. With a 9-0 season to start the 2021 season, Lowery has 1,341 wins and 352 losses and two ties.

Wisconsin
Bruce Erickson, Appleton West (Appleton)

With a record of 500 and 119 in 28 seasons at Appleton West (17) and Appleton North (11), Erickson compiled the highest winning percentage (.808) of any Wisconsin coach with more than 300 career wins. He won four state championships and 20 Fox Valley Conference titles.

Note: Coaches were not chosen for Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming because those states do not sanction high school baseball.
High school basketball: Five-star guard Jaden Hardy expected to sign with G-League - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: Five-star guard Jaden Hardy expected to sign with G-League
Senior high school basketball star Jaden Hardy of Coronado (Henderson, Nev.) is expected to join the NBA G League Ignite team, according to a Saturday report from Shams Charania of The Athletic.

The 6-foot-4 guard is the No. 3 prospect in the Class of 2021 according to 247Sports. Hardy will be following in the footsteps of Class of 2020 prospects Jalen Green, Jonathan Kuminga and  Isaiah Todd among others in selecting the G League path over the traditional collegiate route.

Hardy missed his entire senior season after the Nevada Interscholastic Athletics Association canceled the 2020-21 winter sports season because of COVID-19.

In 2019-20, Hardy earned first team MaxPreps Junior All-America honors after averaging 30.4 points, 9.1 rebounds and 8.4 assists per game. His junior season was highlighted by a 62-point game in which he led his team back from a 21-point deficit. He also recorded 11 rebounds, six assists, five blocks and four steals in the comeback victory.

The McDonald's All-American selection chose the professional path over his final list of college options including Arizona, Arizona State, Kentucky and UCLA.

Hardy is considered one of the most lethal and versatile scorers in the Class of 2021 and is projected to be a lottery pick in the 2022 NBA Draft.
Coronado guard Jaden Hardy drives to the basket.
Photo by: Darin Sicurello
Coronado guard Jaden Hardy drives to the basket.
High school football: Valdosta board will reconsider firing of embattled coach Rush Propst - HIGHSCORE
High school football: Valdosta board will reconsider firing of embattled coach Rush Propst
Rush Propst, the well-traveled and embattled former high school football coach at Valdosta (Ga.), might get a second chance, media reports indicate. The Valdosta City Schools will revisit the coach's April 27 firing Monday after a board member who supported Propst motioned for the special meeting, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported Wednesday.

The school board voted 5-3 to dismiss the coach amid allegations of the coach illegally recruiting five players to Valdosta, including Californian Jake Garcia. However, Warren Lee, one of the three to back Propst, called for the board to reconsider the decision. An announcement post on the school board website read "Revisit non-renewal of head football coach at VHS - Mr. Warren Lee - action required."

That means the board could reinstate Propst, even after the Georgia High School Association upheld the $7,500 fine levied on the program in addition to forcing the school to forfeit seven wins in 2020 and banning the team from the 2021 playoffs.

In February, Propst was the subject of a lengthy deposition that alleged he was involved in recruiting, mishandling money and even interfering in the hiring process that brought him to the program to begin with. Michael Nelson, who has been involved with the Valdosta Touchdown Club booster organization for many years, said in his sworn deposition that Propst, among other things, paid for housing for two transfers, facilitated recruiting of players with the help of college coaches, asked for a "funny money" slush fund and meddled in his own hiring process.

Propst owns a career record of 299-92 – including 7-5 in his lone season at Valdosta – and has won seven state titles during a high-profile, 30-year career. He garnered national attention while at Hoover (Ala.), which was featured on MTV's popular "Two-A-Days" reality show. He resigned there in 2007 and was dismissed at Colquitt County (Norman Park, Ga.) in 2019 after being charged with lack of compliance, improper conduct with students, dishonesty and misuse of public funds and property.

The AJC reported Propst remains under investigation by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission, which can deny teaching certificates. The commission pulled Propst's credential after his Colquitt County dismissal, but regained in on appeal, leading to his hiring at Valdosta.
Former Valdosta coach Rush Propst
File photo by Gary McCullough
Former Valdosta coach Rush Propst