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High school basketball: DeMatha coach Mike Jones returns to lead USA Men's U16's National Team - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: DeMatha coach Mike Jones returns to lead USA Men's U16's National Team
USA basketball announced that Mike Jones of DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) will return to lead the U16 men's National Team coaching staff along with assistant coaches Eric Flannery of St. Edward (Lakewood, Ohio) and Sharman White of Pace Academy (Atlanta).

The trio already helped USA Basketball men's U16 and U17 teams to a combined seven gold medals, including in 2019 when they led the USA U16 National team to a 6-0 record.

Team USA will compete in the 2021 FIBA Americas U16 Championship, where the top four finishers earn a berth into the 2022 FIBA U17 World Cup. The coaching selections were made by the USA Basketball Men's Developmental National Team Committee.

"The committee felt these three coaches were the right group to lead the USA U16 National Team in 2021," said Sean Ford, committee chair and USA Basketball Men's National Team director per the official press release. "More than the fact that they were not able to coach in 2020 as expected, Mike, Eric and Sharman have outstanding experience coaching with USA Basketball, and they will lead this U16 team by exemplifying and developing the values of the USA Basketball Junior National Team program that they have been a huge part of creating."

This is Jones' 22nd USA Basketball coaching assignment, including winning the 2019 U16 gold medal, serving as a lead coach at the 2019 USA Men's Junior National Team July minicamp and as a court coach at the 2019 USA Men's Junior National Team October minicamp. He also served as head coach of the USA Nike Hoop Summit Team in 2013, 2014 and 2018, and as a USA Hoop Summit assistant in 2012 and 2017.

"I am truly honored to represent our country and to work with such a great staff and tremendous young men," Jones said. "We know that we have a challenge ahead of us, and we will embrace it, prepare for it, and we look forward to competing with some of the best talent from the Americas. We are very excited and anxious to get back on the court and chase a gold medal."

Jones has coached DeMatha for 20 years where he owns an all-time record of 511-119 (.811 winning percentage). He led the Stags to their fourth consecutive MaxPreps Top 25 finish this past season, finishing No. 4 with a 9-0 record in an abbreviated 2020-21 campaign.

Flannery enters his 14th coaching role for USA basketball in 2021 after recently completing his 25th season with St. Edward where he's compiled a 483-132 overall record.

White will undertake his 10th USA basketball coaching assignment. White is 449-106 overall with nine state titles in 23 seasons as a high school basketball head coach.

The coaches will look to continue the tradition of the USA U16 men's basketball program that has compiled an all-time record of 31-0 in FIBA Americas Championship competition since its debut in 2009.
Mike Jones coaches up his DeMatha squad during a timeout.
Photo by: Mike Braca
Mike Jones coaches up his DeMatha squad during a timeout.

What will high school football look like in the fall? - HIGHSCORE
What will high school football look like in the fall?
North Carolina and Rhode Island conclude the highly unusual 2020-21 high school football season with championships this weekend. Once those states are a wrap, attention will shift to the fall with plenty of questions and speculation about what exactly that will look like across the country.

Without another major surge in COVID-19 numbers, prep football in the fall should look all but identical to pre-2020 according to most state associations and federations. How many fans will be in attendance is still very much up in the air.

"Assuming everything continues as is, we plan a full and regular school year of education-based athletics in 2021-22, including football," California Interscholastic Federation Executive Director Ron Nocetti said. "We'll know more about fan allowance as we get closer to our start dates."

A good number of states already — 35 of the 50 — powered through with football last fall (Vermont played touch and not tackle) and all but four of those states held state championships. Alaska, Minnesota, West Virginia and Wisconsin stopped short of championship games due to the pandemic.

To get to the fall finish line took much resolve. That may have been exemplified best by Michigan, which first moved football to the spring, then back to the fall only to delay the season 42 days starting in November due to surging COVID-19 numbers. The state eventually crowned 10 champions by Jan. 23.

The states that completed fall seasons are ready and eager to go, just tweaking pandemic protocols which will likely be loosened significantly from 2020.

"Hopefully we're getting closer and closer to normal as possible," De La Salle (Concord, Calif.) coach Justin Alumbaugh said. "We'd be naive to think it's going back completely to old times. We still need to address locker room issues. And testing needs to be more streamlined and easier. There surely is a lot more administrative work on coaches than there used to be."

California is one of the 11 states that played its 2020 season in the spring of 2021. Of those states, only three played for state titles. All spring teams have trickier off-seasons than normal with summer conditioning only a few weeks away.

Of the four states that didn't play a down of tackle football in 2020-21, Hawaii is the only one to hold spring scrimmages, including one last week between perennial state powers St. Louis (Honolulu) and Punahou (Honolulu). It took three days for St. Louis to complete 150 COVID-19 tests, all which came back negative, according to its coach. 

"We got to see all the young guys play and seniors got to play and wrap up their year," St. Louis coach Ron Lee told Paul Honda of Hawaii Prep World. "Kids are so happy we had this. I feel sorry for other schools that didn't have what we did, being out there with their friends. They were having fun. They've learned how to handle disappointment."

St. Louis will meet Kamehameha Kapalama (Honolulu) this week in another scrimmage, which indicates a green light for an Aug. 6 start date for the fall season. That would put Hawaii in the leadoff spot, like normal, for the 2021 fall season.

Utah took those reins last season, kicking off the 2020 season on Aug. 13. The season went largely unscathed, finishing off with five state championship games in late November. With its entire schedule planned for 2021, including another Aug. 13 opening, Utah once again has its foot firmly on the floor board.
Crimson Cliffs helped Utah kick off the 2020 season with an opening game against Manti.
File photo by Adam Cartwright
Crimson Cliffs helped Utah kick off the 2020 season with an opening game against Manti.
Like many states, Utah is seeing significant realignment, including the re-addition of 1A football, giving it six classifications. It's also seeing a larger-than-normal turnover at the top with 16 new head coaches in the state, according to the Utah Desert News.

That national trend is likely residue of burnout from navigating through the pandemic, coaches say.

"It seems like (2020) never really started or really ended," said Alumbaugh, whose six-game season ended April 17.

Said Nocetti: "So much more is being put on the plate of these coaches. I would hope that communities would be even more supportive and appreciative of high school coaches during this time. They need it. That's the only way they will continue to stay longer."

The passion for football is never going away in Texas.

Spring football is back in the Lone Star State after being canceled in 2020. The University Interscholastic League allows 18 spring training practices over 34 days, giving teams the opportunity for scrimmages or even a spring game. Programs still must follow the UIL's own risk mitigation guidelines, but things may be loosening in areas concerning specific mask mandates and dressing room policies.

Some of the larger schools, which had regular seasons moved back a month, moved back their spring workouts. Others, like defending Class 5A-I champion Ryan (Denton), opted out of spring ball completely. All of that points to the fall season starting right on time and looking back to normal.

On Wednesday, the UIL also sent a release that summer marching band and strength and conditioning activities may begin immediately following the end of the 2020-21 school year.
Westlake quarterback Cade Klubnik will help his team defend a Texas 6A-I championship in 2021.
File photo by Sean Roach
Westlake quarterback Cade Klubnik will help his team defend a Texas 6A-I championship in 2021.
Other state updates:

* Georgia started with a few hiccups to start 2020, but primarily proceeded as normal. The 2021 season is aligned as previous years: Teams are allowed one spring and one fall scrimmage (or two in the fall), acclimation period begins July 26 and first day of practice in pads is Aug. 2, first games are Aug. 20 and playoffs begin Nov. 12.

* In Florida, beyond massive new districts, regions and reclassifications for 2021, the state's football season should look much like 2019 and prior. The playoff system returns to district play for teams in Class 5A through 8A.

* In Tennessee, the TSSAA board voted to allow summer team camps and the return of 7-on-7 football, as long as COVID-19 protocols are in place. Those activities had been suspended since the pandemic began. The state's high school sports governing body also changed its state championship venue for two seasons to Chattanooga's Finley Stadium, which seats 22,000, Concerns over locker room space and use — with so many games — were addressed and dismissed.

* In Ohio, a positive was gleaned from adjustments to the pandemic — increasing its playoff format. Last fall, the OHSAA allowed every team to enter the playoffs due to the shortened season. It was met with overwhelmingly positive feedback, according to OHSAA executive director Doug Ute. Thus it expanded its playoff qualifiers in 2021, from pre-2020 season, to 16 schools per region.
Virginia crowns first spring football champions in high school history - HIGHSCORE
Virginia crowns first spring football champions in high school history
Like any other year, the Virginia High School League crowned six state football champions Saturday afternoon in six different classifications. But these were clearly different.  From all records MaxPreps has researched, Virginia is the first state to ever award football championships in the spring.

The Riverhead Gladiators were officially the first ones crowned, with a 65-29 victory over the Galaxy Maroon Tide in the Class 1 title game. A 34-point second-point explosion led the Gladiators to their 10th straight win of the season. They outscored opponents 483-119 on the season. 

Perennial East power Oscar Smith (8-0) followed with a 62-21 Class 6 title win over South County, and Stone Bridge (8-0) took the Class 5 crown with a 13-10 overtime win over Highland Springs. (See all the champions below).

The VHSL was one of 15 states to move the traditional fall 2020 season to the spring due to COVID-19 pandemic. Of those states, 11 decided on abbreviated spring seasons, with just three opting for playoffs. North Carolina and Rhode Island have scheduled state championship games next week.

According to MaxPreps senior writer and historian Kevin Askeland, no states have ever held football championships in the spring, although one in California was scheduled in 1919. That title game was called off when Orange League champion Fullerton disbanded a month before the scheduled contest.
Oscar Smith turned around a loss in the 2019 VHSL Class 6 title game with a resounding 65-21 win over the Stallions on Saturday.
File photo by Fred Ingham
Oscar Smith turned around a loss in the 2019 VHSL Class 6 title game with a resounding 65-21 win over the Stallions on Saturday.
2021 Spring VHSL State Football Championships

Class 1Full bracket can be found here - 2020 Virginia High School Football Playoff Brackets: VHSL Class 1
Tucker DeVries named 2020-21 HIGHSCORE Iowa High School Basketball Player of the Year - HIGHSCORE
Tucker DeVries named 2020-21 MaxPreps Iowa High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Tucker DeVries of Waukee is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Iowa High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-6, 190-pound senior helped the Warriors go 16-2 en route to the program's first state championship.

DeVries averaged 18.5 points, 6.6 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 2.9 steals per contest while shooting 53 percent from the field.

In Waukee's 61-50 state championship game victory over Johnston, DeVries tallied 18 points, six rebounds and four assists, including 12 points in the second half.

Committed to Drake, DeVries is regarded as the No. 90 prospect in the Class of 2021 overall according to 247Sports. Air Force, Creighton, Florida and Iowa State were among the other college basketball programs to extend offers.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
Top 50 high schools with the most combined players in MLB, NBA and NFL - HIGHSCORE
Top 50 high schools with the most combined players in MLB, NBA and NFL
Due to the pandemic, sports fans were treated to meaningful professional football, basketball and baseball games all at the same time. During the first two weeks of October, the regular football season was in full swing, the Lakers and Heat were battling in the NBA finals and four MLB teams were competing for the chance to reach the World Series. Which led us to wonder which schools have produced the most NFL, MLB and NBA athletes.

A quick look at sources like Pro Football Reference, Basketball Reference and the Baseball Cube gave us the answer. Not surprisingly, Long Beach Poly (Calif.) is the overall leader. With 58 former and current NFL players, eight NBA players and 20 MLB players, the Jackrabbits have 86 total athletes in those three professional leagues.

The next two schools on the list — Fork Union Military and Hargrave Military — come with a caveat. While both schools produce four-year high school athletes, they also allow for a fifth-year senior. As a result, some of their numbers are inflated due to the presence of a fifth-year senior who completed his four years of regular schooling at another high school. Fork Union is No. 2 on the list with 74 athletes (including 70 in the NFL) and Hargrave has 49. DeMatha Catholic, a traditional four-year private school, is tied with Hargrave at No. 3 with 49 athletes.

California — particularly Southern California — is home to the majority of the schools on the list. A total of 23 schools from California make the list with 20 of them from Southern California (and San Diego). Florida is next on the list with nine schools.

Schools are listed with the overall number, a breakdown of the number of athletes per sport and some of the more notable professional athletes from the school.
Nick Bosa, St. Thomas Aquinas
File photo by Stuart Browning
Nick Bosa, St. Thomas Aquinas
Schools With Most Pro Athletes

1. Long Beach Poly (Long Beach, Calif.) — 86
NFL: 58
NBA: 8
MLB: 20
Notable: NFL — DeSean Jackson, Jurrell Casey, Marcedes Lewis, JuJu Smith-Schuster, Willie McGinest, Carl Weathers (aka Apollo Creed); NBA — Jordan Bell, Mack Calvin, Tyus Edney; MLB — Milton Bradley, Tony Gwynn, Chris Gwynn, Randy Moffitt, Chase Utley.

NFL: 70
NBA: 3
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Carlos Hyde, Michael Thomas, Anthony Castonzo, Vinny Testaverde, Plaxico Burress, Eddie George; NBA — Shammond Williams, Khyri Thomas.

3. Hargrave Military Academy (Chatham, Va.) — 49
NFL:
32
NBA: 15
MLB: 2
Notable: NFL — Leonard Floyd, Shaq Lawson, Torry Holt; NBA — Terry Rozier, Josh Howard, Montrezl Harrell; Marreese Speights.

3. DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) — 49
NFL: 28
NBA: 19
MLB: 2
Notable: NFL — Cameron Wake, Cyrus Kouandjio, Brian Westbrook; NBA — Kenny Carr, Adrian Dantley, Danny Ferry, Markelle Fultz, Sidney Lowe, Jerrod Mustaf, Victor Oladipo, Keith Boggans.

5. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) — 47
NFL: 37
NBA: 0
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Geno Atkins, Joey Bosa, Nick Bosa, Lamarcus Joyner, James White, Michael Irvin; MLB — Tyler Greene.

5. Compton (Calif.) — 47
NFL: 23
NBA: 7
MLB: 17
Notable: NFL — Datone Jones, Robin Cole, Roy Jefferson, Marv Fleming; NBA — DeMar DeRozan, Woody Sauldsberry; MLB — Gary Ward, Duke Snider.

5. Fremont (Los Angeles) — 47
NFL: 19
NBA: 3
MLB: 25
Notable: NFL — David Fulcher, Ricky Bell; NBA — Curtis Rowe, Joe Caldwell; MLB — Willie Crawford, Eric Davis, Bobby Doerr, Dan Ford, George Hendrick, Chet Lemon, Bobby Tolan.

8. Dorsey (Los Angeles) — 45
NFL: 33
NBA: 2
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Keyshawn Johnson, Karim Abdul-Jabbar, Butch Johnson; MLB — Sparky Anderson, Chili Davis, Derrel Thomas.

9. Male (Louisville, Ky.) — 40
NFL: 28
NBA: 8
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Chris Redman, Michael Bush; NBA — Darrell Griffith, Ralph Beard, Winston Bennett; MLB — Dixie Howell.

10. Crenshaw (Los Angeles) — 39
NFL: 25
NBA: 9
MLB: 5
Notable: NFL — De'Anthony Thomas, Brandon Mebane, Wendell Tyler; NBA — John Williams, Kevin Ollie, Marques Johnson; MLB — Chris Brown, Darryl Strawberry, Ellis Valentine.

11. Northwestern (Miami) — 38
NFL: 35
NBA: 2
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Teddy Bridgewater, Amari Cooper, Antonio Bryant, Marvin Jones; MLB — Mickey Rivers.

12. McKinley (Canton, Ohio) — 37
NFL: 30
NBA: 6
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Percy Snow, Wayne Fontes, Marion Motley; NBA — Eric Snow, Phil Hubbard, Gary Grant.

13. Berkeley (Calif.) — 36
NFL: 18
NBA: 3
MLB: 15
Notable: NFL — Chidi Ahanotu, Je'Rod Cherry, Larry McGrew; NBA — Phil Chenier, Don Barksdale; MLB — Shooty Babitt, Glenn Burke, Chick Hafey, Billy Martin, Claudell Washington.

14. St. Augustine (New Orleans) — 35
NFL: 32
NBA: 3
MLB: 0
Notable: NFL — Leonard Fournette, Tyrann Mathieu, Trai Turner, Leroy Hoard; NBA — Avery Johnson, Kerry Kittles, Donald Royal.

15. Lane Tech (Chicago) — 33
NFL: 18
NBA: 2
MLB: 13
Notable: NFL — Laken Tomlinson, Fritz Pollard, Cyron Brown.

15. Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Va.) — 33
NFL: 0
NBA: 33
MLB: 0
Notable: NBA — Rod Strickland, Jerry Stackhouse, Rajon Rondo, Stephen Jackson, Brandon Jennings, DeSagana Diop, Carmelo Anthony.

17. Manual Arts (Los Angeles) — 32
NFL: 19
NBA: 5
MLB: 8
Notable: NFL — Steve Broussard, Jon Arnett, Tom Fears; NBA — Freeman Williams; MLB — Paul Blair, Lyman Bostock, Bob Meusel.

18. Lincoln (San Diego, Calif.) — 31
NFL: 25
NBA: 2
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Terrell Davis, Marcus Allen, Dave Grayson; NBA — Norman Powell.

18. Santa Monica (Calif.) — 31
NFL: 20
NBA: 1
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Chad Wheeler, Glyn Milburn, Dennis Smith, Dennis Thurman, R.C. Owens, Lee Grosscup; NBA — Bison Dele; MLB — Tim Leary, Rick Monday, Tyler Skaggs.

18. Pasadena (Calif.) — 31
NFL: 19
NBA: 4
MLB: 8
Notable: NFL — Chris McAlister, Jim Wilks; NBA — Michael Cooper; MLB — Dick Williams.

21. South Oak Cliff (Dallas, Texas) — 30
NFL: 24
NBA: 4
MLB: 2
Notable: NFL — Rod Jones, Wayne Morris, Harvey Martin; NBA — Dennis Rodman, Tony Battie, Darrell Arthur.

21. San Diego (Calif.) — 30
NFL: 17
NBA: 2
MLB: 11
Notable: NFL — Art Powell, Charley Powell, Brick Muller, Steve Neal, Darren Comeaux; NBA — Art Williams, Jeremy Tyler; MLB — Graig Nettles, Randy Milligan.

21. Archbishop Moeller (Cincinnati, Ohio) — 30
NFL: 15
NBA: 1
MLB: 14
Notable: NFL — Bob Crable, Steve Niehaus, Tom Waddle; NBA — Jaxson Hayes; MLB — Buddy Bell, David Bell, Mike Bell, Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, Adam Hyzdu.

21. Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.) — 30
NFL: 11
NBA: 9
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Matt Barkley, Matt Leinart, John Huarte; NBA — Stanley Johnson, LeRon Ellis, Jamal Simpson; MLB — Sergio Santos, Bob Meacham, Ryan McMahon.

25. Evanston (Ill.) — 29
NFL: 24
NBA: 2
MLB: 3
Notable: NFL — Mike Kenn, Paddy Driscoll, Emery Moorehead.

25. Ball (Galveston, Texas) — 29
NFL: 24
NBA: 1
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Mike Evans, Kimble Anders, Charles Alexander; NBA — Damon Jones;

25. Inglewood (Calif.) — 29
NFL: 18
NBA: 7
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Benson Mayowa, Patrick Onwuasor; NBA — Reggie Theus, Paul Pierce, Harold Miner, Jay Humphries, Jason Hart; MLB — Coco Crisp, Pat Dodson.

25. George Washington Prep (Los Angeles) — 29
NFL: 14
NBA: 1
MLB: 14
Notable: NFL — James Lofton, Hugh McElhenny; MLB — Mickey Owen.

25. McClymonds (Oakland, Calif.) — 29
NFL: 8
NBA: 8
MLB: 13
Notable: NFL — Marcus Peters, Wendell Hayes, Jimmy Hines; NBA — Bill Russell, Antonio Davis, Paul Silas, Nate Williams, Joe Ellis; MLB — Curt Flood, Lee Lacy, Ernie Lombardi, Vada Pinson, Frank Robinson.

30. Miami (Fla.) — 28
NFL: 18
NBA: 3
MLB: 7
Notable: NFL — Eddie Brown, Andre Johnson; NBA — Udonis Haslem; Doug Edwards, Steve Blake.

30. Coral Gables (Fla.) — 28
NFL: 18
NBA: 1
MLB: 9
Notable: NFL — Frank Gore, Jonathan Vilma, Al Del Greco, Neal Colzie, Gerald Tinker; MLB — MIke Lowell.

30. Hillsborough (Tampa, Fla.) — 28
NFL: 16
NBA: 0
MLB: 12
Notable: NFL — Azeez Al-Shaair, Anthony Brown, Dan Footman; MLB — Elijah Dukes, Carl Everett, Dwight Gooden, Mike Heath, Gary Sheffield.

33. Glenville (Cleveland) — 27
NFL: 27
NBA: 0
MLB: 0
Notable: NFL — Frank Clark, Ted Ginn Jr., Marshon Lattimore, Cardale Jones, Donte Whitner, Benny Friedman.

33. Longview (Texas) — 27
NFL: 23
NBA: 3
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Trent Williams, Josh Scobee, Bobby Taylor; NBA — David Wesley; MLB — Chris Davis.

33. Yates (Houston) — 27
NFL: 21
NBA: 5
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Santana Dotson, Albert Fontenot, Dexter Manley; NBA — Michael Young, Damyean Dotson; MLB — Steve Henderson.

33. Bishop Amat (La Puente, Calif.) — 27
NFL: 17
NBA: 0
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Daylon McCutcheon, Eric Bieniemy, John Sciarra, Bishop Amat, Adrian Young; MLB — Dan Haren, J.R. Phillips.

33. Sarasota (Fla.) — 27
NFL: 10
NBA: 1
MLB: 16
Notable: NFL — Barry Redden, MLB — Scooter Gennett, Casey Kelly.

38. Central (Miami) — 26
NFL: 25
NBA: 0
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Dalvin Cook, Devonta Freeman, Willis McGahee, Bruce Armstrong, Elvis Peacock; MLB — Ronnie Belliard.

38. Raines (Jacksonville, Fla.) — 26
NFL: 23
NBA: 2
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Jabar Gaffney, Brian Dawkins, Lito Sheppard, Harold Carmichael, Ken Burrough; NBA — Truck Robinson; MLB — Vince Coleman.

38. Washington (Massillon, Ohio) — 26
NFL: 23
NBA: 0
MLB: 3
Notable: NFL — Chris Spielman, Jim Houston, Bob Vogel, Horace Gillom, Devin Smith, Gareon Conley; MLB — Bob Fothergill, Mike Hershberger.

NFL: 20
NBA: 2
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Frank Gifford, Jeff Siemon, Theo Bell, Louis Wright; NBA — Robert Swift, Tyrone Wallace; MLB — Steve Ontiveros.

38. Loyola (Los Angeles) — 26
NFL: 16
NBA: 3
MLB: 7
Notable: NFL — Anthony Barr, George Kunz, Matt Ware; NBA — Hollis Thompson, Toby Bailey.

38. Los Angeles (Calif.) — 26
NFL: 16
NBA: 0
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Larry Brown, Don Paul, Cal Peterson; MLB — Fred Snodgrass.

38. Centennial (Compton, Calif.) — 26
NFL: 14
NBA: 2
MLB: 10
Notable: NFL — Larry Allen, Paul Lowe; NBA — Arron Afflalo; MLB — Mitchell Page, Len Randle, Lonnie Smith, Reggie Smith, Roy White.

38. Proviso East (Maywood, Ill.) — 26
NFL: 11
NBA: 12
MLB: 3
Notable: NFL — Ray Nitschke, Ed O'Bradovich, Ray Buchanan, NBA — Doc Rivers; Michael Finley, Shannon Brown, Jim Brewer, Jevon Carter.

46. Carol City (Miami) — 25
NFL: 19
NBA: 2
MLB: 4
Notable: NFL — Ricky Jean-Francois, Santana Moss, Kenny Phillips; MLB — Nick Esasky, Danny Tartabull.

46. Muir (Pasadena, Calif.) — 25
NFL: 19
NBA: 3
MLB: 3
Notable: NFL — Rod Sherman, Marcus Robertson, Chad Brown; NBA — Jacque Vaughn, Ryan Hollins, Stacey Augman; MLB — Darrell Evans, Jackie Robinson.

46. Oakland Tech (Oakland, Calif.) — 25
NFL: 10
NBA: 2
MLB: 13
Notable: NFL — Marshawn Lynch, Josh Johnson, John Brodie; NBA — Leon Powe, Jim Pollard; MLB — Ricky Henderson, Cookie Lavagetto.

46. Serra (Gardena, Calif.) — 25
NFL: 21
NBA: 2
MLB: 2
Notable: NFL — Robert Woods, Adoree' Jackson, Marqise Lee; MLB — Dominic Smith.

46. Tyler (Texas) — 25
NFL:
24
NBA: 0
MLB: 1
Notable: NFL — Earl Campbell, Greg Ward, Tyus Bowser.